Tag Archives: weaving patterns

Ask Nancy: On Weaving & Baking

Ask NancyIt’s our final blog post of 2016 and we’re saving the best for last: on today’s post, Nancy sprinkles in a little baking knowledge while answering an interesting question from one of our customers.

Got weaving problems? Stumped by your spinning? Our resident expert Nancy Reid will answer all of your burning questions in this new regular feature! Previously only available on our newsletter, we are moving Nancy’s informative column over to the Woolery blog for easy reference. In this month’s edition, we are sharing a few questions about fiber prep; to ask your own question, email weavernancy@woolery.com or click here to post your questions in our Ravelry group

All the Best,

Wave, Perri, and the entire Woolery Team

Q:

I’m looking to weave some soft tea towels from cotton yarn that will to wrap home baked loaves of bread – I would like the towels to be soft and also dense enough to keep the bread from getting too terribly stale. I’m not sure if this is possible, but I wondered if someone might be able to recommend a nice yarn that would work?? It might be a long shot, I’m not sure!

Nancy shares sage advice about weaving & baking on this week's post!

A:

One of the properties of cotton that makes it so wonderful for clothing is that it wicks moisture away from the (skin) surface, carrying it up to the outer surface of the cloth where it can evaporate and cool the body. That precise property of wicking moisture away will create staling very rapidly in a loaf of bread. While a cotton cloth is nice to keep steam from condensing on a fresh-baked hot loaf (unlike plastic, which traps the steam on the surface and causes sogginess), that same cotton cloth will facilitate the further transport of moisture quite well, and make a loaf stale up awfully quickly. For best keeping, allow a loaf to air-cool with good circulation until it reaches ambient temperature, then encase it in nice air-tight plastic. I used to bake professionally long ago…

To answer the non-food textile portion of your question, either 8/2 (found here) or 6/2 (found here) unmercerized cotton will produce the cloth you are looking for.  I set the 8/2 at 20 EPI in a plain weave and the 6/2 at 16 EPI in plain weave.

Including a handwoven tea towel with your home-baked bread is a lovely gift, and we’ve found a few free patterns for anyone interested in a last-minute weaving project this holiday season (hint: this would also be a great hostess gift for New Year’s!):

Free pattern from Louet for handwoven tea towels.

Cornucopia Tea Towels from Louet

Free Friendship Towel pattern from Schacht.

Friendship Towels from Schacht

Free Woven Dish Towel from LeClerc.

Dish Towel from LeClerc

Follow us here on Pinterest for more great weaving inspiration!

Wee Weaving + Artisan Spotlight: Meet Norman Veech

Summer is winding down and before you know it, the kids will be heading back to school. Now is the perfect time to master the art of small weaving projects you can take on-the-go! Schacht has several fun projects using woven squares created on their Zoom Loom:

ZOOMprojects

Pincushions, Infinity Scarf and Slipper patterns are all available for free on the Schacht website.

Artisan Spotlight: Meet Norman Veech

normanveach Norman Veech is a local prolific rug weaver who brought us this handwoven Alpaca rug a few months ago. We’re going to frame it for the shop!

Norman is a kind and compassionate man who has been coming in our shop since we moved it to Kentucky. He took up weaving about 6-7 years ago when he needed something to do while going through chemotherapy treatments. His wife taught him how to weave on a little loom purchased at a flea market, and he liked it so much that he has continued to weave ever since!

Since then, he has traded up to using floor looms to create placemats, table runners and blankets in addition to his favorite project, rugs. Norman isn’t focused on production weaving, but rather weaves for the enjoyment and relaxation the craft provides. Occasionally, he can be found selling his rugs at nearby flea markets and craft festivals such as the Finchville Fall Festival next month.

Many thanks to Norman for allowing us to share his story with our blog readers this month!

All the best,

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team

Spring Crafting, Spring Cleaning!

In our last blog post, we shared some of our favorite inspirational projects for revamping your home décor this season. If you’d rather embark on a little Spring Crafting instead of Spring Cleaning, here are some creative ways to accomplish both at the same time, guilt-free!

RUGS!
April showers may bring May flowers, but they also bring muddy feet to your doorstep.  Here is a simple tutorial showing how to recycle old t-shirts into a fashionable and functional (not to mention, machine washable!) crocheted rug. Of course, a woven rug is another option to try: by choosing thick, sturdy yarns in ‘spring-y’ colors, you can add your own personal touch to your front door. In fact, there are plenty of ways to dress up your doorstep using colorful, easy-care yarns, whether your weave, knit, crochet or rug hook. Below are just a few of our favorite ideas for spring!
rugs

KNIT & CROCHET BASKETS
Organize your life with easy-to-make knit or crochet baskets! Baskets are a great way to use up leftover yarn in your stash, but you can also be strategic in your color choice by using cones of yarn to create matching sets or color-coding your world by using an assortment of yarn colors. Smaller sizes are perfect for holding small trinkets or craft supplies, while larger sizes can house your yarn collection, toys, reusable tote bags, or any number of items that need to be contained!
baskets

ECO-FRIENDLY SPRING CLEANING
Save money and the planet by making your own reusable floor sweeper covers! Choose machine washable yarns in bright colors to create an array of color choices to make you smile. You can find lots of easy patterns to knit or crochet on Ravelry, many of which are free. Reusable towels and scrubbers can also be knit, crocheted, or woven, and are an excellent way to save money and the planet!
cleaning

Here’s one more spring cleaning tip to try: Eucalan wool wash does double duty; here is a video tutorial from Youtube which uses Eucalan to freshen up curtains and drapes for spring!

For more crafty inspiration, click here to view our Welcome Spring inspiration board on Pinterest!

All the best,

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team

Centerpiece Solution + Black Friday Sales!

Every holiday is a chance to get crafty. This week many of us will throw open our homes and welcome friends and family. This got us to thinking about the good ‘ol centerpiece. A centerpiece can’t be too tall or you can’t see Aunt Sue and it can’t be too big or there is no room for the food!

Handwoven Centerpiece

A handwoven mat, yarn buddie, ball of yarn, and peg loom roses make a just right statement for your table.

Here is our answer to the perfect holiday table adornment. It started with the Yarn Buddie and a ball of yarn.  Looking at it made us think that if we could decorate it somehow then we would have the perfectly-sized piece for the table. Ah, ha–pegloom woven roses!

These are quite simple to make and are a great way to use up little bits of yarn. Make a 4-inch square for a rose, or a 2-inch square for a rosebud. Fold the square in half and then in half again and fold around a wire stem. Use floral tape to adhere the rose to the stem. Quick, easy, effective.  Now that’s crafty.

BLACK FRIDAY DEALS!

To kick start the holidays we are having a big blowout Black Friday sale by offering FREE SHIPPING* on any order over $100, plus great specials! Black Friday sale going on now until 10:00 A.M. Saturday, November 26. All Black Friday Specials listed on The Woolery Black Friday Specials page.  (*Free shipping on most products, some manufacturers restrictions apply. Continental U.S. Only.)

Black Friday Speicals!

Shop from the comfort of your own home!

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at The Woolery.  We are thankful for all the creative people in our lives, especially our customers.

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team