Tag Archives: guest post

Spinning with Dyed Fiber + Giveaway

Check out Jillian Moreno's guest post & giveaway on the Woolery Blog! We’re pleased to welcome spinner, author, and instructor Jillian Moreno back to the Woolery blog (click here if you missed her excellent post about spinning tussah silk for embroidery).

Jillian is the author of Yarnitecture: The Knitter’s Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Wantpublished by Storey Publishing in 2016. She is also the editor ofKnittyspin and is on the editorial board of Ply Magazine. She frequently contributes to Spin-Off and PLY Magazine and teaches all over North America. Be warned, she is a morning person and frequently breaks into song before 9am. Keep track of all of her crafty and other pursuits starting April at www.jillianmoreno.comShe lives buried in a monumental stash of fiber and books in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

I have a new spinning and knitting obsession. I’m entranced by working with dyed braids of fiber, dyed the same colorway, but spun in several ways for different effects. I can’t stop myself from playing.

Here’s a braid of Frabjous Fibers BFL top in the beautiful Cottage Garden colorway, normally I would just split it in two and spin it from end to end and ply it, letting it match or marl wherever it wants.

Spinning with dyed fiber, a guest post by Jillian Moreno on the Woolery Blog.

Today I wanted to do something else. I get really sick of the same old, same old yarns, even when I love the colors.

I made two 2-ply yarns in Cottage Garden that look dissimilar, but go together perfectly. My idea was to have one yarn match colors when plied and the second be as mixed up colorwise as it can.

Spinning with dyed fiber, a guest blog post on the Woolery blog by Jillian Moreno.

Left: single with clear colors, Right: single with mixed up colors

For my matching yarn, I split my fiber in two lengthwise, dividing it as evenly as I could. I spun two singles starting from the same end. I checked WPI every once in a while using Rosie’s Precise Spinning Control Card.  I don’t stress the spinning when I try to match color, because I have a couple of tricks I use to ply to match.

  • I rewind my bobbins, so I start plying with the same color I started spinning my singles. I find my spinning is much more consistent at the beginning of my spinning and the colors match up better when I ply.
  • I break it to make it. While I’m plying, if my yarn starts to marl instead of match, I break the single with the overlong color run, break out the rest of the color that is causing the marl, join it back together where the color would match the other ply (I use a spit splice to be sure it holds) and continue plying with matching colors.
Handspun yarn - two ways to spin with dyed fiber - click over to the Woolery blog to read more from Jillian Moreno.

Left: 2-ply with clear colors, Right: 2-ply with mixed up colors.

For my mixed up colors yarn, I split my fiber in two lengthwise, one piece for each ply, dividing it as evenly as I could. I spin to mix up colors as much as possible using these two tricks to get the yarn to marl in the single, then I ply it creating a double marled yarn. You can see the marling in the single on the bobbin above.

  • I split each length of fiber a second time and draft the two lengths together into a single.
  • Before I start drafting them together I flip one of the lengths so the color orientation starts at opposite ends. For example one length starts with green then goes to orange, then red, then pink and repeats, the second flipped length would start with pink, then red, then orange, then green and repeat.

I knit swatches of both yarns and they look great, different but the same, exactly how I wanted them to turn out. I love when that happens. One yarn is clear colored stripes and one is a mixed up tweed in the same colors.

Spinning with dyed fibers - get tips from expert Jillian Moreno on the Woolery blog.

What do you do with it? You might ask. Here’s what I’m thinking today.

I want to make a hat, using the clear, matching colors as the main color yarn, then using the mixed up colored yarn as a contrasting yarn to make a mixed up stripe within each solid colored stripe. Fun, isn’t it?

Lower left, matching colors; lower right, mixed up colors, top swatch mixed up colors as a striped within a solid green stripe.

Lower left, matching colors; lower right, mixed up colors, top swatch mixed up colors as a striped within a solid green stripe.

If you want more ideas to spin your dyed fibers or want some spinning suggestions on making exactly the yarn you want to knit, check out my new book Yarnitecture:The Knitter’s Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Want. 

GIVEAWAY

Enter to win a copy of Jillian Moreno's new book, Yarnitecture, on the Woolery blog!Jillian and the folks at Storey Publishing have graciously donated a copy of Yarnitecture: The Knitter’s Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Want to give away to one of our lucky readers! To be eligible in the prize drawing, please email contest@woolery.com with the subject line “Yarnitecture” and your first name, last initial & state/province in the body of your message. 

Please note, by entering this contest, you will be automatically signed up for our newsletter list which you can opt out of at any time; if you already receive our newsletter, we will simply confirm the address that we have on file so that you do not receive duplicate copies. 

We will randomly select one lucky winner to announce on our next blog post on Tuesday, November 22, 2016. Good luck! 

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Guest Post: The Dyers’ Garden with Dagmar Klos

Have you ever wanted to explore the world of natural dyeing? In today’s guest post, expert Dagmar Klos shares her own dyers’ garden with you! 

Well, the garden is finally planted. It was a long, cold, snowy winter here in Chicago. Spring was also rather chilly with no temptation to plant early. Then off to Kentucky for the Sheep and Fiber Festival, a fun event (I just love going to sheep festivals). Before heading back to Chicago, I stopped at the Woolery in Frankfort – what a treat, wish I lived closer. Upon returning home, it was time for spring cleaning in the garden. I live in Chicago, and although my property is twice the size of a normal city lot, I do have a lot of shade due to the amount of trees including a large, old willow. I have a small space in the front that has sunshine daily which is where I plant my marigolds along with some coreopsis planted right by the marigolds. Unfortunately, some of the coreopsis took a hit with the cold winter and I will need to get new ones for the bare spots; This is the extent of my dyer’s garden – for the time being.

Marigolds

Marigolds

I love dyeing with marigolds; they are happy little yellow/orange flowers. I prefer the French marigolds over the African variety, but I did just learn from my neighbor who is a horticulturist that the African variety has a dwarf version. I’ll need to look into that. The area in which I grow the marigolds is limited in size (about 9’ x 4’) and I think that the regular African marigolds would look too big. Years ago, in the backyard I planted Rudbeckia, black-eyed-Susans, but they are not thriving and are slowly disappearing due to too much shade. On the other hand, the sweet woodruff that I planted (I only bought one flat) has multiplied over and over. I should really plan to harvest the roots sometime this summer as I get them out of the areas where they shouldn’t be. Sweet woodruff is in the madder family. The roots yield a light red and the leaves, a light brown.

Sweet Woodruff

Sweet Woodruff

When I look at my beautiful, old black willow (one reason why we bought this house), I am sad knowing that one day it will be gone. It’s 60 years old and showing signs of decline. The dynamics of the back yard will change significantly which will mean more sunlight. And I think – oh, I will be able to expand my dye garden! One plant at the top of the list is weld also known as dyer’s mignonette or dyer’s weed, or dyer’s rocket. Weld yields a wonderful, lightfast, washfast yellow. It’s a cool yellow and when over-dyed with indigo gives a fabulous green. It’s not the prettiest plant, which explains one of its names – dyer’s weed – but the color is wonderful. Since I love black-eyed-Susans, I will plant more of them. My list would also include dahlia, daisy, dyer’s chamomile, dyer’s greenweed, golden rod, golden marguerite, queen Anne’s lace, yarrow, and zinnia. If I had more land, the list would be longer.

Weld, also known as Dyers' Rocket or Dyers' Mignonette

Weld, also known as Dyers’ Rocket or Dyers’ Mignonette

Another thought pops into my head – I will need to buy a second refrigerator. I don’t always use up all my flowers for dyeing during the growing season. In fact, I need to collect and keep some of them for when I teach marigold dyeing. In the past I have dried the flowers; dying primarily with only the flower heads for the purest color the plant can give me, adding the leaves and stems will desaturate the color which is perfectly fine at times. But drying requires forethought. With a hectic schedule I find that right before a predicted frost, I am in my flower bed, cutting off the flower heads and putting them into freezer bags. Needless to say that looking into my freezer may surprise some, but it always brings a smile to my face remembering the sunshine of the summer and the fun that lies ahead while I’m dyeing in the dead of winter with that bit of sunshine.

Zinnia

Zinnia

coe_photoDagmar Klos is a dye master, fiber artist, and teacher. Author of the Dyer’s Companion, co-publisher and coeditor of the Turkey Red Journal from 1995-2006 (newsletter dedicated to natural dyes), recipient of the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Dyeing. She also teaches at the Fine Line Creative Arts Center in St. Charles, Illinois. She lives with her husband and two big dogs in Chicago, Illinois.