Tag Archives: zoom loom

Make Your Own Zoom Loom Pumpkin

Pumpkin Zoom Loom Project from The Woolery

Fall is here and that means, Pumpkin Spice everything! We’re adding some pumpkin to our weaving with this Pumpkin Zoom Loom project! The Schacht Zoom Loom is a great way to get started with weaving. If you don’t know how to weave on a zoom loom, no worries, we have this YouTube video that will tell you everything you need to know:

Now that you know how to weave on the Zoom Loom, here are all the materials you’ll need to make your pumpkin:

Materials needed to make Zoom Loom Pumpkin

First we need to weave up our squares using the Zoom Loom, so get weaving! We will use the ends to sew up our pumpkin, so skip weaving in your ends.

Weaving with the Zoom Loom

Weave up a total of 6 orange squares and 1 green square. Remember, don’t weave in or snip your ends.

ZoomLoomPumpkin-4

It’s time to start sewing our pumpkin together. Place two orange squares on top of each other with one end at each corner, sew one side of the squares together using a Backstitch. Make sure you are sewing one warp thread in from the outside so your stitches stay put.

Sewing your squares together

Continue sewing orange squares together in the shape below. You are basically attaching a new square to every side of one middle square. Be sure to keep all of your seams on the Right Side (outside of the pumpkin). If you run out of yarn because your end is to short, just attach more yarn and keep sewing.

How to sew your orange squares together

Next we are going to make our pumpkin 3D by sewing up the sides. Line up the sides of your “cross” above and stitch them together so you have an open cube. The square that is in the middle in the photo above will become the bottom of your cube.

Sewn up cube

You can now sew your last remaining square to close the top. Just line up your edges and start sewing. Leave one side open so you can stuff your pumpkin.

Stuffing your Zoom Loom Pumpkin

Once your pumpkin is stuffed you can close up your last edge. Pull any remaining yarn tails to the inside of the pumpkin to hide them.

Orange Zoom Loom Cube

We pretty much just have an orange cube, now we need to make it a leaf so it actually looks more pumpkinish. Grab your one green Zoom Loom square and pinch a bit of one of the sides towards the back. Make a stitch along the backside to make the fold stay put.

Pinch your green square and make a stitch

Now do the same thing to the side to the the left of the side you just folded.

Your green square with the two folds

Flip your leaf over so the back side is facing you, then fold the top corner down to the middle and stitch it there so it stays.

The final fold for your leaf

Trim all the ends  on your leaf and flip it back over and it’s all finished.

The finished leaf

Our leaf needs a vine to connect it to the pumpkin. You can make a vine however seems best to you, you could make a crochet chain, braid, or tie knots like a friendship bracelet. We chose to do a knitted I-cord, our I-cord is 3 stitches on US Size 3 needles and is 3.5″ long.

Sew one end of your vine to the very middle on the top side of your pumpkin.

Sew your vine to your pumpkin

Then sew the other end of your vine to the top middle of your leaf.

Sew your vine to your leaf

Give your vine a little twist to make it curly and your pumpkin is ready for Fall! Folks around The Woolery have been calling our pumpkin the “squmpkin” because it’s a square pumpkin. Happy squmpkin making to everyone! If you have ideas for future Zoom Loom tutorials you’d like to see, please let us know in the comments!

Finished pumpkin Zoom Loom Project

 

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Make Do & Mend: How to Give New Life To Well-Loved Garments

When your favorite garment has more holes than a slice of swiss cheese, do you toss it in the rag pile or trash can? Rips and tears near a seam are easy to repair invisibly, but a hole that’s front and center requires a little bit of ingenuity – here’s where the visible mending trend can come in handy.

Visible mending has become an art form unto itself by using a variety of materials and techniques to highlight what was once an imperfection in a garment, turning it into something unique.

Below, you’ll find some creative ways to reinvigorate your wardrobe with visible mending!

All the Best,

Wave, Perri and the entire Woolery crew

Fixing a holey sweater with embroidery - great visible mending idea from Hunter Hammersen!

Image by Hunter Hammersen, used with permission.

Knitwear designer Hunter Hammersen has been chronicling her process for repairing a holey sweater using colorful embroidery techniques.

Here, a pair of torn jeans have been mended using Sashiko, a traditional Japanese embroidery technique that employs repeating geometric designs.

A combination of fabric patches and Sashiko were used to mend these children’s garments on the Swoodson Says blog.

Find loads of visible mending inspiration here on the Tom of Holland blog; this excellent tutorial on the Sew Mama Sew blog will help you master the sewing techniques needed to embark on your own visible mending adventures with needle and thread.

Bonus: You can combine any of the techniques listed above with our latest tutorial, using Zoom Loom squares to patch holes in any garment – click here to download our free PDF!

Free PDF tutorial to mending holes using Zoom Loom squares as patches.

What are your favorite tutorials or techniques for visible mending? Leave them in the comments, or share your photos with us over on Instagram using #thewooleryshop in your post!

Guest Post: 5 Easy & Decorative Techniques for Seaming Zoom Loom Squares

You’ve woven dozens of squares, and the seemingly daunting task of seaming has confronted you. Fear not! Here are five great tips and tricks for seaming Zoom Loom squares together, all with their own unique applications.

If you know which method that you want to use in seaming your squares together at the beginning of your project, this will make your life easier in the long run. Another pre-seaming tip is to not wash or full your squares before sewing your squares together. If you are creating larger pieces of fabric with your zoom loom squares, it helps to sew squares into long strips, then sew those together in one run.

Whip it Good

whip finished

First we start with what may be thought of as the easiest technique, sewing them together with a needle and a thread using the whip stitch. Leave a long tail after you have finished weaving the square, then take a tapestry needle and thread your long tail through the needle. Lay your squares flat on the table in front of you, then sew from the right side to the left side along the same. Start by sewing into the first loop of the adjoining square. Go back and forth between the squares making sure the squares stay aligned. This keeps the fabric pretty flat as the whole, and makes fewer puckers.

whip flat

If you find that first technique a little difficult, you can hold the squares with their “right” sides together and whip stitch along the edge to secure them. This method doesn’t alway lay flat, but it will still give you a practically invisible seam.

whip together

 

Hook, Line, and Seamer

The next few techniques involve nothing more than a crochet hook (a US size E hook should do) and some extra yarn.slip stitch beginning

The first method utilizes a simple slip stitch. Start by holding your squares right sides together, then insert your hook through both layers and pull a loop of your extra yarn through the layers, then insert hook a little bit to the side of where you made your first insertion, and pull another loop through the layers, and the loop on your hook.slip stitch secondary

This method creates a strong join, bulkier than the whip stitch, but good for dense blankets and outer garments.

slip stitch finishedslip stitch finished backslip stitch finished top

This next method also uses a crochet hook, and adds some length and width to your square. Start in one corner of the square, and single crochet around the square, putting 3 single crochets in each of the corners.

single crochet step 1single crochet step 2single crochet step 3

Then after your squares have the single crochet border, sew them together using the whip stitch method. Having extra fabric to sew into creates a stronger join, and if you use a contrasting color, this can add another level of design to your project.

single crochet seamed

Another common technique is more decorative than structural, but the added lace makes an airy fabric, perfect for shawls (like the citrus squared shawl), scarves and other light-weight garments. Start in one corner of a square, and slip stitch into the fabric, then chain 3 stitches and slip stitch into the bottom corner of the adjacent square. 

chain 3 beginningchain 3 step 2chain 3 step 3

Chain 3 and slip stitch back into the original square, moving up the side of the square as you go along. Repeat this process going back forth between the squares until the whole side is seamed.

chain 3 step 4chain 3 finished

These techniques are just a few that you can add to your toolbox, and can be used in seaming larger pieces of handwoven fabric. Each technique is good for different purposes, and different types of yarn. Experiment with different seaming techniques in your projects, and see what you like best!

finished techniques

BenjaminKBenjamin Krudwig is a crochet and knitwear designer from Colorado who also spends much of his time spinning and weaving. Benjamin is the founder and co-owner of Benjamin Krudwig Fiber Arts and Design, along with his wife who sews project bags for knitting and crochet. Benjamin spends his time during the week running the social media program at Schacht Spindle Company.

Handmade Holidays

The Christmas Countdown is on! For crafters who enjoy making handmade gifts for loved ones, this can be a busy time of year. Quite often, we have the best of intentions to start our holiday crafting early, but sometimes, a last-minute craft crunch simply can’t be avoided!

Let the Woolery come to the rescue this year! We have plenty of thoughtful gift ideas which are quick to knit, crochet, and weave to keep everyone on your list happy!

Gifts to Knit

rikkeThe popular Rikke Hat by Sarah Young is a simple, unisex beanie that knits up quick in DK weight yarn. It’s available for free here on Ravelry!

leafwashclothWashcloths are certainly useful gifts, but they aren’t always fun to knit again and again. Megan Goodacre’s Leafy Washcloth is a fun, free pattern you’ll enjoy making each time! Click here for the free pattern on the Tricksy Knitter blog.

Image © Jane Richmond

Image © Jane Richmond

A chunky-weight cowl will fly off the needles, and Jane Richmond’s Marian is a mock-mobius which can be worn in a variety of ways. This design would look fabulous knit up in handspun yarn, too! It’s available for free here on Ravelry.

Gifts to Crochet

SONY DSCThe Triangle Christmas Tree ornaments by Sarah Freeman are a cinch to make! Based on the traditional granny square motif, they will stitch up quickly and are great for detashing. Click here for links to the free pattern and video tutorial on the Ravelry pattern page.

urbanslouchIt’s always good to have a few hats on hand for last-minute gift emergencies, and this unisex design is a great choice which is easy to customize. The Urban Slouchy Beanie is available for free here on the Little Things Blogged blog.

stripyStripy Mitts by Sandra Paul are a colorful gift to make for the style maven on your list! This pattern is available for free and is a great way to use up leftover yarns in your stash, too.

Gifts to Weave
When it comes to speedy weaving , Schacht’s portable Zoom Loom is bar none. We have plenty of free patterns (courtesy of Schacht) to put those woven squares to work this year – click here to view them all! Below are a few of our favorite projects for woven tree ornaments which use just 1 or 2 Zoom Loom squares – click each image below to view pattern instructions!

Evergreen Dream

Evergreen Dream

Santa Sock

Santa Sock

Snow Bird

Snow Bird

To add a festive touch, why not embellish your ornaments with sequins, beads, or needle-felted fiber designs? Let your creativity flow as you put your own unique touches on your Zoom Loom projects!

2014 Fiber Toys of Christmas

FT14BANNER

Our annual holiday promotion, the 12 Fiber Toys of Christmas, is in full swing! Each Friday, we feature a favorite fiber toy with a special deal and a chance to win that particular toy (tool). Weekly specials and giveaways will be posted on our Facebook pageTwitter feed, and it will also be included in our newsletter.

These are weekly specials which expire every Friday (when the new one starts), so be sure to check the links above so you don’t miss out!

All the best,

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team

 

Spinnin’ and Zoomin’

Spinzilla has drawn to a close and the members of Team Woolery are tallying up their yardage to submit this week. While we anxiously await the results of this competition to see who can spin the most yarn, we’d like to say that we’ve been quite impressed with the spinning skills and variety of projects our team members have exhibited. Here are just a few of the many great photos they’ve shared with us last week during Spinzilla!

jdeshera

Team Woolery Member jdeshera’s mixed BFL.

alainncaora

Team Woolery member AlainnCaora’s Alpaca/Merino single.

jenaus0524

Team Woolery member JenAus0524’s BFL/Silk drop spindle single & handpainted BFL roving on the bobbin.

Another fun obsession for fall is pin loom weaving – it’s a great way to use up leftover yarn while learning a new skill. You can even use your handspun! Pin looms come in all shapes and sizes, but share one common characteristic: portability! The Weave-It loom is one of the better known pin looms (you can read more about the history of pin looms here on the eLoomanation site), but the hand-held pin loom recently received a modern redesign from the folks at Schacht when they created the  Zoom Loom, a new shop favorite here at the Woolery!

zoomloomKnitters and crocheters who are curious about the wonderful world of weaving will find the Zoom Loom to be an engaging introduction, and Schacht has plenty of free weaving patterns to put your woven squares to good use. We’re also starting to see some interesting ideas crop up on Pinterest, which we’re collecting here on our Weaving inspiration board. Later this month, we will be sharing a few of our favorites with you right here on our blog!

All the best,

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team

Wee Weaving + Artisan Spotlight: Meet Norman Veech

Summer is winding down and before you know it, the kids will be heading back to school. Now is the perfect time to master the art of small weaving projects you can take on-the-go! Schacht has several fun projects using woven squares created on their Zoom Loom:

ZOOMprojects

Pincushions, Infinity Scarf and Slipper patterns are all available for free on the Schacht website.

Artisan Spotlight: Meet Norman Veech

normanveach Norman Veech is a local prolific rug weaver who brought us this handwoven Alpaca rug a few months ago. We’re going to frame it for the shop!

Norman is a kind and compassionate man who has been coming in our shop since we moved it to Kentucky. He took up weaving about 6-7 years ago when he needed something to do while going through chemotherapy treatments. His wife taught him how to weave on a little loom purchased at a flea market, and he liked it so much that he has continued to weave ever since!

Since then, he has traded up to using floor looms to create placemats, table runners and blankets in addition to his favorite project, rugs. Norman isn’t focused on production weaving, but rather weaves for the enjoyment and relaxation the craft provides. Occasionally, he can be found selling his rugs at nearby flea markets and craft festivals such as the Finchville Fall Festival next month.

Many thanks to Norman for allowing us to share his story with our blog readers this month!

All the best,

Chris, Nancy, and the entire Woolery team